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Frances Dodds

Bio:

Frances Dodds is the Senior Editor at DuJour Magazine, where she covers culture and style. She has her MFA in Nonfiction Writing from Columbia University and lives in Brooklyn. 

    Recent Articles
    • An Unusual Story of Captivity

      An Unusual Story of Captivity

      Amor Towles' second novel, A Gentleman in Moscow, does not disappoint

      Amor Towles is standing in the lobby of the Yale Club. He’s wearing a gray, trimly fitted suit that complements his gray, trimly clipped beard—the respectable sort found on older professional men who’ve earned the leisure of kempt scruff. His handshake has the svelte just-so firmness of a veteran businessman, ... More

    • Hearth Break in the Hamptons

      Hearth Break in the Hamptons

      Hamptonites are warming to wood-burning stoves in droves

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    • Hearth Break in the Hamptons

      Hearth Break in the Hamptons

      Hamptonites are warming to wood-burning stoves in droves

      In the constant tug-of-war between past and future ways of life, there’s the occasional comforting overlap—a trend that combines elements of nostalgia with components of groundbreaking practicality and design. Wood-burning stoves are catching on like wildfire—or should I say, domestic fire—in the Hamptons this year. According to William Brunner at ... More

    • An Intimate Look at an American Icon

      An Intimate Look at an American Icon

      In the forthcoming book Misty Copeland, a celebrity photographer sheds light on a celebrated ballerina

      Photographer Gregg Delman, who’s captured everyone from Oscar Isaac to Katy Perry, is no stranger to the strictures of time and concept that often dictate celebrity portraiture. But when he first shot Misty Copeland in 2011, it felt different—even transformative. “There was no set concept,” Delman says. “I wanted her ... More

    • Scenes from Another New York

      Scenes from Another New York

      Photographer Tod Seelie showcases work inspired by New York City's empty, abandoned spaces

      You might have heard of Tod Seelie, the Brooklyn-based photographer who captures people and moments at the fringes of the New York social scene. If not, you've probably seen his work: Besides his 2013 book, Bright Nights: Photographs of Another New York, his gritty, mesmerizing work has appeared in ... More

    • Room Request! Grafton on Sunset

      Room Request! Grafton on Sunset

      A restful poolside oasis in West Hollywood

      When you think of Sunset Boulevard, the first descriptor that comes to mind might not be cozy. Neon lights, palm trees, movie stars, maybe. But there’s undeniably a certain hominess to the Grafton on Sunset, even as you venture from your plush bedroom to the sunny restaurant terrace for breakfast—sipping ... More

    • Real Talk with an “UnREAL” Star

      Real Talk with an “UnREAL” Star

      UnREAL's Gentry White talks race relations on the show and the explosive finale of season two

      Joining the cast of a show like UnREAL, which has been heralded as one of the sharpest pieces of social commentary on television today, is no floatie ride on a lazy river. But Gentry White is more of a whitewater rafting kind of guy anyway. White plays Romeo, the ... More

    • Renée Zellweger Goes off Script

      Renée Zellweger Goes off Script

      Caught in the cross hairs of media scrutiny, in a moment of unfiltered emotion, the Bridget Jones star raises her voice

      A tall, wiry man with round glasses is standing in the palatial lobby of the Getty Center in Los Angeles, the sprawling museum and gardens complex snuggled into the hills of Brentwood. He’s holding an iPad, which he’s suspending feebly toward distracted passersby. He asks if we’d like to take a ... More

    • Renée Zellweger Goes off Script

      Renée Zellweger Goes off Script

      Caught in the cross hairs of media scrutiny, in a moment of unfiltered emotion, the Bridget Jones star raises her voice

      More

    • A Cave of One’s Own

      A Cave of One’s Own

      For one artist, there’s nowhere to go but down

      For the past 30 years, Ra Paulette has been digging in the desert. Unknown to the world until 2014, when the short documentary CaveDigger was nominated for an Oscar, Paulette has been single-handedly digging ornate, mesmeric, cathedral-like spaces into the Ojo Caliente sandstone of western New Mexico.   To date, 65-year-old ... More