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High Infidelity in the Information Age

Why romantic relationships in the digital age are too informed for their own good

The Cheaters Hall of Shame 

By Adrienne Gaffney

While new methods of detection are countless, illicit affairs are a time-honored tradition. From Old Hollywood to Congress, here are a few of the most captivating betrayals.

Eddie Fisher

After Fisher’s best friend Mike Todd was killed in a plane crash, his consolation of Todd’s distraught widow, Elizabeth Taylor, took an untoward turn. Wife Debbie Reynolds learned of the affair when she called her husband at a New York hotel room and Taylor answered the phone. The subsequent breakup made for months
of tabloid fodder and spelled the end of Fisher’s career.

Eddie Fisher
Credit: Getty Images

Anthony Weiner

The scandal that ushered cheating into the social media age: All of America learned the difference between a direct message and a public tweet after the New York Congressman’s “Carlos Danger” was posted publicly, lighting up CNN over a previously sleepy Memorial Day weekend and resulting in his resignation from Congress.

Image Credit: Richard B. Levine/Levine Roberts/Newscom via ZUMA Press.

Hugh Grant

Shortly before the 1995 release of Nine Months, his first major U.S. film, Grant was discovered by L.A. police receiving oral sex in a car from prostitute Divine Brown and charged with lewd conduct. His shamefaced mug shot was beamed across the globe and his relationship with then-girlfriend Elizabeth Hurley underwent surveillance-like scrutiny. Grant bought himself valuable goodwill with contrite honesty in numerous television appearances.

Hugh Grant
Credit: Getty Images

Ingrid Bergman

The wholesome Swedish star, married at the time to an older doctor, saw her burgeoning career tripped up after a fling with director Roberto Rossellini—during the filming of Stromboli in 1950—resulted in a pregnancy and a horrifying public castigation. Colorado Senator Edwin C. Johnson went as far as to call for her to be blacklisted from Hollywood for her “moral turpitude.”

Ingrid Bergman
Credit: Getty Images

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