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MILCK on Finding Empowerment Through Pain

From her viral Women’s March anthem “Quiet” to her newfound creative confidence, this singer is spreading love and positivity

While her breakout hit “Quiet” went viral after becoming the unofficial anthem of the 2017 Women’s March, MILCK is no longer in protest mode when we catch up on a call, light-heartedly injecting giggles and sarcasm throughout our conversation. The song became a feminist siren call, and in 2018, MILCK, born Connie Lim, was asked to perform alongside two-dozen female singers from Yoko Ono to Halsey at the 2018 Women’s March on New York City, offering another platform for her soulful anthem.

Since then, this poetic songstress has released her debut EP This Is Not The End, toured with Jason Mraz and Aussie darling Amy Shark, all the while working on new music—but not necessarily with the revolution in mind.

“It’s funny, people have been like, ‘Let’s make the next song for the next movement!’ and I’m like, am I supposed to do that?” Lim says. “I’m only going to write songs that feel very honest and reflect my story. If people want it to be bigger, then that’s awesome.”

In fact, “Quiet” was originally intended to be more personal than political. A survivor of abuse, Lim says writing the song was her way of freeing herself from her emotional chains. “That song opened my mind and heart and let me breathe again. It was like, ‘screw everyone,’” she says. The collective support among women that the song received, Lim says, only aided her in leaving behind her feelings of self-doubt, but adds that every day is still a journey. “We all feel those pressures, even outside of me being an artist. Am I doing enough? My life journey is to convince myself that I am enough,” she explains.

MILCK

While her deep inner life is apparent in her dramatic beats and heartfelt lyrics, Lim says her next collection of music will be a bit lighter in shade. “My family has always encouraged me to write happier music and I would just be like, ‘No. Let me be emo,'” she says with a chuckle. “My most recent songwriting is reflecting how I feel, which is more confident and happier,” she says.

Lim owes that happiness, at least in part, to her hard-won long term relationship. “Survivors are really good at running away from relationships. I always know my exit strategy and have my bags metaphorically packed,” she says. “The concept behind the new music is about learning not to run.” With her commitment to both her relationships and her unique sound solidified, Lim is ready to push herself emotionally by migrating from catharsis to joy. For a taste of MILCK’s positivity and love, listen below.

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